THE WATERS WE FISH

 

 

New River:
The New River forms in the North Carolina high country where it flows north into Southwest Virginia. Designated as a National Wild and Scenic River in 1976, the New flows through some of the southeast's finest mountain scenery. South Valley Anglers guides on approximately 125 miles of this ancient waterway, offering our guests the best access and the best chance at a true New River trophy. The New is an incredible smallmouth and walleye fishery as well.

 

James River:
Deep in the Appalachian Mountains the Jackson and Cowpasture merge to form the James River. The James then travels 350 miles through the Old Dominion to the Southern Chesapeake Bay. South Valley guides exclusively on the upper 75-80 miles of this fishery. A gorgeous mountain river boasting a thriving musky fishery, this is the ideal host for your pursuit of predators on the fly.

Smith Mountain Lake:
Smith Mountain is a 20,000-acre impoundment that has been a destination for striped bass anglers since the 1970's, clear, deep waters with acres of standing timber and dozens of large tributaries make SML a vibrant striper fishery. Plan on seasonal success in the spring and fall with bird activity during winter months opening up big water opportunities for the fly caster.

 

Staunton River:
A unique fishery for this area awakens every spring on the Staunton, the circle of life brings waves of pre spawn stripers upstream from Kerr Reservoir. The river begins at Leesville Dam and flows into the John H. Kerr Reservoir in South Central Virginia, winding through the rock laden upper reaches down through the bottomland and vast agriculture of the region. This is a spring run and water temperatures are the driving factor, so timing is crucial.

 

new & james river musky
Late September – March
Late April – June (post spawn)

 

staunton river striped bass
April – May

 

smith mountain lake striped bass
April – May
October – November

South Valley Anglers operates on arguably the finest musky water in the Southeast, convenient to both the New and James Rivers, two unique fisheries that are home to a vibrant predator population.